Genesis 16: Hagar and Ishmael

Earnest Examination

This series is presented as an honest, sincere look into the study of the Bible with my own personal theories, opinions, comments and that of others’ insights and research into what the verses could mean. I cannot claim one way or another that everything that I am stating is fact and the true meaning of what is meant in these verses.

To lay it out in a way that I can manage, I have highlighted the texts of verses that I either don’t understand or have a comment or question about in yellow. And the comments I’ve left beneath it will be of a smaller font and using brown text.

I would love it if you’d join me in this journey and if you have any insights and/or knowledge of these chapters/verses etc., please feel free to share with me and the other readers. Any chance to get a clearer understanding of the Bible and Jesus Christ would be welcomed with open arms.

Version used is from (KJV) Genesis 16

1 Now Sarai Abram’s wife bare him no children: and she had an handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar.
2 And Sarai said unto Abram, Behold now, the LORD hath restrained me from bearing: I pray thee, go in unto my maid; it may be that I may obtain children by her. And Abram hearkened to the voice of Sarai.

It’s interesting how even though Abram trusted in the Lord that he will have descendants that come from his own body, it did not occur to him that it would come from his own wife, Sarai. Instead, because Sarai thought that she could not bear children, then his descendants would have to come from someone else. Thereby offering up her handmaid so that her husband could have children through his bloodline. Was this planned by God all along? If God is omnipresent and omniscient, then He would already know that this is how the story is going to play out.
3 And Sarai Abram’s wife took Hagar her maid the Egyptian, after Abram had dwelt ten years in the land of Canaan, and gave her to her husband Abram to be his wife.
4 And he went in unto Hagar, and she conceived: and when she saw that she had conceived, her mistress was despised in her eyes.
I do want to make another point here, about who many believe wrote Genesis to begin with. Of course this question brings up many debates, but the person most referenced as having written Genesis is Moses. Whether that be from word of mouth and passed down traditions and tales, or whether perhaps he had the testimony dictated to him by an angel of the Lord, or the Lord Himself, it is interesting that a lot of these passed down tales give us an inner look into the emotions and feelings of others. Was there written dictation that Hagar began to hate her mistress? Was there proof of some sort that there was animosity brewing between the two because Hagar felt herself better than Sarai because she can conceive and Sarai couldn’t? And this brings into question how these texts could have been written with the knowledge of what people were feeling and thinking. Yes, God would be able to know how everyone’s feeling, so could it be possible that whoever did write Genesis gets insights into everyone’s thoughts and feelings? And if certain chapters were dictated, how can we be, FOR SURE, that the dictation came from an angel of the Lord, or the Lord Himself? Or even if they came from visions or dreams? How can we be sure that these visions/dreams/etc. were not misconstrued?
I also want to bring up the emotion of Hagar herself for her thoughts of pride for being able to conceive and thinking herself better than someone else because of this. I don’t want to judge this characteristic, because I don’t know what’s going on in her mind/thoughts, but thought it was an interesting perspective. Of course this particular version of the text does not reference Hagar’s complete feelings to Sarai like others do, like the NIV for instance. The NIV gives a little more context to this relationship.

5 And Sarai said unto Abram, My wrong be upon thee: I have given my maid into thy bosom; and when she saw that she had conceived, I was despised in her eyes: the LORD judge between me and thee.
6 But Abram said unto Sarai, Behold, thy maid is in thy hand; do to her as it pleaseth thee. And when Sarai dealt hardly with her, she fled from her face.
Here is another reference to Sarai and Hagar’s relationship, which was never brought up before Hagar became pregnant with Abram’s child. And another wrongdoing, even though it was Sarai’s idea to have Hagar become Abram’s wife as well specifically to have children through her. I also want to make note that at this point, it doesn’t seem as if the Lord has given any instruction as to how to live one’s life. The 10 commandments were not created yet, and the word Love has not even been mentioned yet other than in reference to procreation as can be seen in NIV Genesis 4. In fact, it won’t be mentioned for a few more chapters, and even in that context, as we will see, I have issues with.
So at this point in the Bible, it would appear that people have no way of knowing how to treat each other. We can see such disrespect coming from Hagar to Sarai, and Sarai to Hagar, with not a mention of compassion or kindness. In fact, the last few chapters dealt with gain as far as land and wealth and bloodlines. It’s fascinating that Love has not even been a component yet. Even at the creation of Adam and Eve and the love of a husband and wife, or the love for their children.

7 And the angel of the LORD found her by a fountain of water in the wilderness, by the fountain in the way to Shur.
8 And he said, Hagar, Sarai’s maid, whence camest thou? and whither wilt thou go? And she said, I flee from the face of my mistress Sarai.

The phrase “the angel of the Lord” grabs my attention and to me, implies that this angel is special in some way. Why “THE” angel? Not “an” angel? Why is there this implication that it is not just a “random” angel of the Lord that came to Hagar, but the angel of the Lord? What does this mean? Does this angel have some sort of significance? There are indications of heirarchies within the angelic/heavenly realm, so does this angel hold a particular importance or certain leadership quality that others angels wouldn’t?
9 And the angel of the LORD said unto her, Return to thy mistress, and submit thyself under her hands.
10 And the angel of the LORD said unto her, I will multiply thy seed exceedingly, that it shall not be numbered for multitude.
This gives me an even deeper impression that this angel, for some reason, holds more weight than the others. Why would this angel specifically say, “I will multiply thy seed”? Wouldn’t that be something that the Lord would say? If the angel is speaking for the Lord, then the wording, I would think, would be more like, “The Lord will multiply thy seed”. Not I, as in the angel itself.
11 And the angel of the LORD said unto her, Behold, thou art with child, and shalt bear a son, and shalt call his name Ishmael; because the LORD hath heard thy affliction.
Just a quick note, “Ishmael” means “God listens.” or “God will hear.” or similar variants to this.
12 And he will be a wild man; his hand will be against every man, and every man’s hand against him; and he shall dwell in the presence of all his brethren.
So why would this be? This sounds like more of a curse than a blessing. Is this “angel of the Lord” merely warning Hagar that this is how her son will be considered? Is it just what was in Ishmael’s destiny? There are theories that Ishmael’s descendants are known today as the Muslims, or Arabs, Arabian Muslims, with some history provided by Muhammad/Quran.
So another question I have is, if the angel never mentioned that Ishmael would grow up to be at odds with every man, would this prophecy still play out as told? Did the angel’s prophetic warning have anything to do with how Hagar raised Ishmael, with the expectation that he would be against others and others against him? Did the angel set the precedent with this foretelling?

13 And she called the name of the LORD that spake unto her, Thou God seest me: for she said, Have I also here looked after him that seeth me?
Hm… now I’m really confused. The angel of the Lord was speaking to Hagar… so why is this verse now considering him the Lord? And if this was the angel of the Lord, then surely the text would clearly imply again “the angel of the Lord”. Not “name of the Lord that spake unto her.” Unless it is indicating that by being addressed by this angel, she realizes that Thou God, meaning the angel’s God, and thus God Himself, has seen her in her distress and is appealing to her to return to Sarai even amidst all of the hostility. It still does not explain though why in this verse the angel is considered the Lord… Could “the angel of the Lord” be the Holy Spirit? Therefore indeed a significant part of God? Or perhaps as some theories speculate, could it be the Christ Consciousness before Jesus Christ was incarnate? Even so, the strange prediction that Ishmael will play a substantial role in his dealings with other mankind sets an interesting and perplexing anecdote, as if setting the stage for what is to come.
14 Wherefore the well was called Beerlahairoi; behold, it is between Kadesh and Bered.
15 And Hagar bare Abram a son: and Abram called his son’s name, which Hagar bare, Ishmael.
16 And Abram was fourscore and six years old, when Hagar bare Ishmael to Abram.

Throughout this chapter, I have to bring up again how interesting it is that the one message that Jesus Christ teaches, of Love to God and to each other, has not been mentioned yet. In fact, like I stated above, Love is not even a factor and has not been mentioned in Genesis yet, from Adam and Eve’s creation, to Abram’s timeline, 2,000 years since the beginning, according to the Bible. Has this concept, this feeling, not have even manifested yet? Are humans at this point of time just multiplying out of duty to keep one’s heritage/bloodline going? We can see how people have treated each other throughout all of this, with brother against brother, son against father, woman against woman due to pride, jealousy, envy, etc., etc., etc. I think Love will be a specific recurring topic that I will keep a very close eye on going forward.

 

As usual, I want to reiterate that some of my thoughts and theories may be way off base, and I also research some other things on the side as well to try and get a broader understanding of what I’m reading, so please bear with me, or, even better, if you have insights that bring more light to these verses, please let me know.

I enjoy bouncing off theories and theology off of each other and love to hear other people’s perspectives on things. Thank you for reading and I look forward to hearing from you!

Genesis 5: From Adam to Noah

Earnest Examination

To start, I’ve realized that I have never read the Bible front to back, and so would like to remedy that. On some of my posts, I quote from the Bible, which I feel is a little insincere if I’m not going to study the whole Bible. So this is my chance to get closer to the Word and really understand the book that I occasionally quote from. 

Originally, I was going to start with the New Testament as a friend has advised me to do, since when I started on the Old Testament I kept getting hung up on what I saw at the time were contradictions, and baseless wickedness and corruption. It repelled me from the Bible. She mentioned that that is exactly why Jesus Christ came. To do away with the “old” ways and bring about a new, better way of living. Which is to love and care about one another. The reason the Old Testament is so important is so that we know the conditions of how the world used to be, before Jesus Christ arrived to show us a more peaceful and loving way to be. 

Now that I feel I may have a better understanding of this, I am compelled to start from “The Beginning“, both literally and figuratively. After having attempted Matthew 3, I realize that I am constantly having the urge to go back through the Bible to check references and names, etc. Since my desire is to take this one step at a time and build upon the knowledge based upon the timeline laid out before us in the Bible, I have decided to revisit the time I tried to read the Bible front to back, and see if my old views still stand. 

Make no mistake, I will still have questions and ponderings about why God decided to do the things He’s done (and of course more questions on top of that), but I have learned not to condemn or judge such actions since I do feel some things are beyond our understandings and it is not my place to judge. I will try my best to look at it from an unbiased and simply curious, thoughtful mind. 

To lay it out in a way that I can manage, I have highlighted the texts of verses that I either don’t understand or have a comment or question about in yellow. And the comments I’ve left beneath it will be of a smaller font and using brown text.

I would love it if you’d join me in this journey and if you have any insights and/or knowledge of these chapters/verses etc., please feel free to share with me and the other readers. Any chance to get a clearer understanding of the Bible and Jesus Christ would be welcomed with open arms.

All verses used are from biblestudytools.com (NIV) Genesis 5

From Adam to Noah

1 This is the written account of Adam’s family line. When God created mankind, he made them in the likeness of God.
2 He created them male and female and blessed them. And he named them “Mankind” when they were created.
This verse is a little intriguing. It seems to allude that not only did God create Adam and Eve, but the wording seems to imply that God created other mankind too. Could it be possible that since the Bible is the story of Jesus, specifically, that we only see His timeline from when He was first created/born as Adam? Some people speculate that Jesus has been reincarnated through different incarnations since His first creation as Adam. If the Bible’s main focus is on Jesus, then it wouldn’t necessarily cover God’s other creations of mankind. Perhaps what we’re presented with in the Bible is only one story out of many.
3 When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.
There’s a popular saying: “You’re the spitting image of your father.”

FUNFACT:

The Phrase Finder suggests the phrase came into being as a morph from the original spit and image or, perhaps, spitten image. It notes that George Farquhar wrote the line, “Poor child! he’s as like his own dadda as if he were spit out of his mouth,” in his play “Love and a bottle” in 1689.

Charming, isn’t it?

But the Grammarist suggests a much older origin for the phrase spit and image, the predecessor of spitting image, pointing to the Biblical story of Adam’s creation, in which God created the first man from “spit and mud.”

Splitting Image or Spitting Image? Don’t Be Fooled!

Another theory:

Some of the folk etymologies have the spit (expectoration) and image (a doll) used in a black magic ceremony to clone you; others cite “spat” (the offspring of shellfish) as part of the origin. According to word sleuths William and Mary Morris, some linguistic experts think “spit” is derived from “spirit,” noting that the southern pronunciation of the letter r is sometimes indistinct. In other words, the original would have been, “She’s the very spirit and image of her mother.”

What’s the origin of “spitting image”?

It is interesting that this phrase has origins in spit and making a clone of you, since spit is a common way to obtain DNA from someone. And of course, there is research and science showing that cloning is possible.

4 After Seth was born, Adam lived 800 years and had other sons and daughters.
This is the verse I was waiting for in the last chapter. I was questioning who was Cain’s wife since at that time, it was believed to only be Adam, Eve and Cain (since he killed his brother). But since we are presented with this verse, it becomes clear that his wife must have been a sister since there were presumably no other human beings around.
Which also brings me to the hypothesis from above that perhaps God did create more “mankind”, but we only learned of Adam and Eve’s conception.

5 Altogether, Adam lived a total of 930 years, and then he died.
6 When Seth had lived 105 years, he became the father of Enosh.
7 After he became the father of Enosh, Seth lived 807 years and had other sons and daughters.
8 Altogether, Seth lived a total of 912 years, and then he died.
9 When Enosh had lived 90 years, he became the father of Kenan.
10 After he became the father of Kenan, Enosh lived 815 years and had other sons and daughters.
11 Altogether, Enosh lived a total of 905 years, and then he died.
12 When Kenan had lived 70 years, he became the father of Mahalalel.
13 After he became the father of Mahalalel, Kenan lived 840 years and had other sons and daughters.
14 Altogether, Kenan lived a total of 910 years, and then he died.
15 When Mahalalel had lived 65 years, he became the father of Jared.
16 After he became the father of Jared, Mahalalel lived 830 years and had other sons and daughters.
17 Altogether, Mahalalel lived a total of 895 years, and then he died.
18 When Jared had lived 162 years, he became the father of Enoch.
19 After he became the father of Enoch, Jared lived 800 years and had other sons and daughters.
20 Altogether, Jared lived a total of 962 years, and then he died.
21 When Enoch had lived 65 years, he became the father of Methuselah.

A timeline showing the genealogy of these names can be found here.

So if we are to assume that there were no other human beings other than Adam and Eve’s lineage, then it’s obvious that intermarriage and/or just coupling with one another’s family members was culturally acceptable and the only way to populate. Upon further investigation, we know that this practice later becomes unacceptable due to genetic complications and the Lord speaking of this in Leviticus 18. I won’t get into that just now, but just thought it would be nice to mention that chapter as a reference.
And now that I think about it, the time frame of Genesis itself is a little questionable when we take into account who allegedly wrote Genesis and how many years must have transpired during that time. Not to mention the very destructive force of the flood and who and what it must have wiped out during its duration. Which begs the question, if the flood did indeed wipe out the rest of humanity other than Noah’s lineage like the Bible indicates, then did they keep accurate records and representation of the history and genealogy up until that point? Did they pass this information down throughout the years so that their children’s children will know exactly how the creation started and the names and times involved? If they didn’t, then we have to wonder how Moses (if he is indeed the one who wrote Genesis like some scholars claim) knew about God, Adam, Eve, and everything else that happened during Genesis. Was he just combining writings and texts from everything known and available since then and compiling them together to make the book?
22 After he became the father of Methuselah, Enoch walked faithfully with God 300 years and had other sons and daughters.
23 Altogether, Enoch lived a total of 365 years.
24 Enoch walked faithfully with God; then he was no more, because God took him away.

I had to hone in on the term “walked faithfully”, which presumably means metaphorically walking; as in, following his footsteps in a spiritual manner. Not that he physically walked with him. (Although as we saw in Genesis 3, God was described as physically walking in the Garden, so perhaps it could be used in that sense as well.)

Now I want to address the interesting differentiation between the phrase “he died” which was added to every man on this list except Enoch, which instead stated “he was no more”. Which would obviously point out that this was a special circumstance. So what does this verse mean?

One theory proposed here is that since Enoch followed God’s law and pleased Him so much with his righteousness, God did not let Enoch “see” death and instead whisked him peacefully away to… Heaven, presumably?
And if one wanted to do a little further digging into what made Enoch so special, there is the Gnostic Text (not in the Bible for one reason or another…), the Book of Enoch, that one could check out if they were curious or would like to do some investigative research.

It speaks of very fascinating things concerning the “Watchers” (another term for fallen angels – since their original role was to simply watch humans, but fell due to their desire to mingle and ‘procreate?’ with the humans instead. In the Book of Enoch, we see how Enoch tries to intercede on behalf of the fallen angels since the fallen angels actually implored Enoch to speak for them since they knew about his close relationship with God.

And as we’ll see in the next chapter, the implication of “sons of God” (speculated to be referred to as angels) mating with human women to give birth to the Nephilim is addressed very briefly. The Book of Enoch aims to fill some interesting holes into this theory.
25 When Methuselah had lived 187 years, he became the father of Lamech.
26 After he became the father of Lamech, Methuselah lived 782 years and had other sons and daughters.
27 Altogether, Methuselah lived a total of 969 years, and then he died.
28 When Lamech had lived 182 years, he had a son.
29 He named him Noah and said, “He will comfort us in the labor and painful toil of our hands caused by the ground the LORD has cursed.”
30 After Noah was born, Lamech lived 595 years and had other sons and daughters.
31 Altogether, Lamech lived a total of 777 years, and then he died.
32 After Noah was 500 years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.
It has to be noted that while every single one of these firstborns are named to each man of this genealogy, it does not expand anywhere (at least not in this chapter..) about the other sons and daughters that it also mentions for each one. If each generation had a set of, say, 2+ pairs of a male to female ratio that also had children of their own, in addition to the main genealogy mentioned here, then there could be literally thousands of people wandering the Earth leading up to the flood, depending on how many different pairings/offspring were alive and procreating at that point. (Add to that, if one is to take the theory of fallen angels also taking upon themselves women and creating more offspring from them, then there could be countless of people/nephilim inhabiting the land during that time. It is also worth noting that there are theories that the flood was delivered in order to wipe out the nephilim from the planet. We will dig into that theory more in the next chapter.)

The next chapter delves into the famous flood and the probable causes of what initiated it. Whether it is biblically accepted or not, the implications on why the flood happened have been debated and studied upon for centuries without a clear answer. So we’ll take a good, long look at that next.

And again I want to reiterate that some of my thoughts and theories may be way off base, and I also research some other things on the side as well to try and get a broader understanding of what I’m reading, so please bear with me, or, even better, if you have insights that bring more light to these verses, please let me know.

I enjoy bouncing off theories and theology off of each other and love to hear other people’s perspectives on things. Thank you for reading and I look forward to hearing from you!

Fact checking is extremely important. I want to reiterate not to take everything at face value; no matter what you read, where you read it from, or who you hear it from. And to be clear, do not rely on “fact checking” websites to give you accurate information either. These are just as likely, (if not even more likely…), to feed false information and false debunking accounts to manipulate the reader. Please take everything into consideration before adhering to a certain narrative – and always keep your mind open to other possibilities.

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Genesis 4: Cain and Abel

Earnest Examination

To start, I’ve realized that I have never read the Bible front to back, and so would like to remedy that. On some of my posts, I quote from the Bible, which I feel is a little insincere if I’m not going to study the whole Bible. So this is my chance to get closer to the Word and really understand the book that I occasionally quote from. 

Originally, I was going to start with the New Testament as a friend has advised me to do, since when I started on the Old Testament I kept getting hung up on what I saw at the time were contradictions, and baseless wickedness and corruption. It repelled me from the Bible. She mentioned that that is exactly why Jesus Christ came. To do away with the “old” ways and bring about a new, better way of living. Which is to love and care about one another. The reason the Old Testament is so important is so that we know the conditions of how the world used to be, before Jesus Christ arrived to show us a more peaceful and loving way to be. 

Now that I feel I may have a better understanding of this, I am compelled to start from “The Beginning“, both literally and figuratively. After having attempted Matthew 3, I realize that I am constantly having the urge to go back through the Bible to check references and names, etc. Since my desire is to take this one step at a time and build upon the knowledge based upon the timeline laid out before us in the Bible, I have decided to revisit the time I tried to read the Bible front to back, and see if my old views still stand. 

Make no mistake, I will still have questions and ponderings about why God decided to do the things He’s done (and of course more questions on top of that), but I have learned not to condemn or judge such actions since I do feel some things are beyond our understandings and it is not my place to judge. I will try my best to look at it from an unbiased and simply curious, thoughtful mind. 

To lay it out in a way that I can manage, I have highlighted the texts of verses that I either don’t understand or have a comment or question about in yellow. And the comments I’ve left beneath it will be of a smaller font and using brown text.

I would love it if you’d join me in this journey and if you have any insights and/or knowledge of these chapters/verses etc., please feel free to share with me and the other readers. Any chance to get a clearer understanding of the Bible and Jesus Christ would be welcomed with open arms.

All verses used are from biblestudytools.com (NIV) Genesis 4

Cain and Abel

1 Adam made love to his wife Eve, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Cain. She said, “With the help of the LORD I have brought forth a man.”
2 Later she gave birth to his brother Abel. Now Abel kept flocks, and Cain worked the soil.
3 In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the LORD.
4 And Abel also brought an offering—fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. The LORD looked with favor on Abel and his offering,
5 but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor. So Cain was very angry, and his face was downcast.

When I first read these verses, I was thinking, for one, why would the Lord care about material offerings? Like sacrifices? To me, to my understanding at the time, God wouldn’t be swayed by materialistic offerings. After all, even without attempting to study the Bible, it’s known to not place your heart and desire onto material things. So it confused me as to why He was so pleased by the offering that Abel gave him. And was there any significance in sacrificing the “firstborn” of his flock?
My second thought was, “does God have favorites?”. I know, it might seem a bit juvenile or amateurish, but to claim that one understands exactly what’s going on in the thoughts of God or any others for that matter, is presumptuous and only speculation.

6 Then the LORD said to Cain, “Why are you angry? Why is your face downcast?
7 If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must rule over it.”

So after trying to come to an understanding about why God would be accepting of Abel’s offering and not Cain’s, it seems as if the answer lies in the thoughts and the intention of those making the offering. Since Abel gave up his (presumably) prized firstborn of his flock with the hopes of honoring God, while Cain, it seems, merely offered up his crops (and not the best ones – but just some regular crops… I suppose), Cain was more doing it out of an obligation than out of sincerity.
So it seems what this boils down to, is that God knows what’s inside our hearts, and if we are doing the right thing rather than just pretending or “putting on a show”, if you will, then you will find favor with the Lord. Since God knew already that Cain did not have pure intentions, his offering was looked down upon as not worthy.
Again, these are merely my interpretations of things that I gather from further studying of other sources and commentary, as well as trying to glean understandings from the Bible, so if this is completely wrong, then please address this with me. I would appreciate it!

8 Now Cain said to his brother Abel, “Let’s go out to the field.” While they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him.
Well, that was fast.
This reminds me of when you watch a show or a movie, and there’s something obviously edited out of the portion you just watched, and it confuses you and makes you wonder what part was missing. This is exactly how I feel during these verses. Now it could be because we don’t get a first-person view of Cain’s thought processes during all this, but just the mere fact that right after God told Cain that he should do what is right and that he must rule over sin, Cain commits murder right in the next verse. I don’t know about you, but this seems a little premature.
Right after God tells him that speech? What other details happened in between that time? If any of us are at all familiar with the Bible and other influences into how the Bible came to be about, we would know about the many, MANY books that were edited out of the final version. Could there be additional answers and information that fill in the dots throughout some of the Gnostic / Apocrypha, and perhaps other texts that have yet to be found or have been destroyed?

9 Then the LORD said to Cain, “Where is your brother Abel?” “I don’t know,” he replied. “Am I my brother’s keeper?”
10 The LORD said, “What have you done? Listen! Your brother’s blood cries out to me from the ground.

It’s interesting to me that God asked Cain where Abel is, although the notion is that God already knows. So was God asking this of Cain as a way to test him? Either way, God would already know what Cain’s answer will be, so can I surmise that God involves Himself in pretenses and, like I mentioned in a previous chapter, participates in the role that He was destined to fill? Perhaps it’s because Cain does not know about God’s omniscience, and so God was indeed testing the heart of these people (even if He already knew) because these people did not already know that this is what is going on.
11 Now you are under a curse and driven from the ground, which opened its mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand.
12 When you work the ground, it will no longer yield its crops for you. You will be a restless wanderer on the earth.”
13 Cain said to the LORD, “My punishment is more than I can bear.
14 Today you are driving me from the land, and I will be hidden from your presence; I will be a restless wanderer on the earth, and whoever finds me will kill me.”
15 But the LORD said to him, “Not so ; anyone who kills Cain will suffer vengeance seven times over.” Then the LORD put a mark on Cain so that no one who found him would kill him.

I am confused about what Cain is describing as ‘the land’. Adam and Eve were already expelled from the Garden of Eden. To wander other parts of the Earth, I assumed. Now here is Cain, talking about being driven from the land, again, and being doomed to be a restless wanderer on the Earth. He says it like the part of land he did live in was separate than that of the Earth. Am I misunderstanding this verse or looking too much into it? Does it simply mean that he was driven out of one area of land into another?

Then we have God’s mercy on Cain even though Cain killed his brother allegedly right after God lectured him on doing the right thing. It seems as if Cain took the rebellious route anyway and latched on to his envy and pride and killed his brother knowing that it was wrong. Even while knowing the presence of the Almighty.

Think of it this way. Cain knew God and spoke with Him, literally offered up his crops to Him only to have his offerings rejected. But Cain knew His presence. Knew His existence. In today’s age, we have to have belief and faith and many of us have not seen God (that we know of) or spoken with Him, and we are still expected to stand for what’s right. Cain literally was in the presence of God and still sinned. How much harder would it be for the rest of us? (I am not condoning sinning just because we haven’t had the same situation as Cain and Abel, just pointing out how much more of a disadvantage those of us in today’s time would likely be compared to those in the Beginning.)
And again, even after Cain kills his own brother, God still shows mercy and protects Cain from being killed by any other.

16 So Cain went out from the LORD’s presence and lived in the land of Nod, east of Eden.
Again, this verse alludes to the fact that the land in which Cain lived with his family was filled with God’s presence. I have already assumed that it’s not the Garden of Eden since Adam and Eve were expelled from there before Cain and Abel were even born. Is this correct? If so, am I to conclude that there are two different levels that the Adam and Eve family lived in before they came to Earth? The first being the Garden of Eden, for Adam and Eve. Then they were cast out of there onto a different land, but still within God’s presence, before Cain was expelled from this second place onto what we call Earth? Again, not all of the dots are filled and one can only theorize or speculate as to what these verses mean.
17 Cain made love to his wife, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Enoch. Cain was then building a city, and he named it after his son Enoch.
18 To Enoch was born Irad, and Irad was the father of Mehujael, and Mehujael was the father of Methushael, and Methushael was the father of Lamech.
19 Lamech married two women, one named Adah and the other Zillah.
20 Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who live in tents and raise livestock.
21 His brother’s name was Jubal; he was the father of all who play stringed instruments and pipes.
22 Zillah also had a son, Tubal-Cain, who forged all kinds of tools out of bronze and iron. Tubal-Cain’s sister was Naamah.
23 Lamech said to his wives, “Adah and Zillah, listen to me; wives of Lamech, hear my words. I have killed a man for wounding me, a young man for injuring me.
24 If Cain is avenged seven times, then Lamech seventy-seven times.”

I decided to skip the verses above because most of those names I am unfamiliar with at this time. However, I wanted to point out that while Lamech killed someone for hurting him, are we to take this to mean that Lamech did this in self-defense? And is this why Lamech has a higher degree of being avenged? Because it was not a kill out of spite like that of Cain’s, but that of self defense? Also, if we want to get technical with the whole family line, then I am assuming that it was a family member that Lamech killed, since at the time, presumably, there are no other human beings on the planet besides Cain’s family (and Adam and Eve still in the different land that they live in – without anyone else since Cain killed his only other sibling). As a matter of fact, we are all related to each other if we all ultimately came from Adam and Eve.

For that matter, although this chapter briefly mentions genealogy, where did the two women that Lamech married come from? Again, I am assuming they came from within Cain’s own family line, so they’re all interbred with one another. We don’t get clear information on who Adah and Zillah are in relation to the others. And with that being said, where on Earth (no pun intended) did Cain’s wife come from?? What are we missing here? Did Adam and Eve have a daughter and this is who Cain married and had children with?
If this was the case, why does the Bible not expand upon this? Where is the information?

I want to mention, again, if one were to check out the Gnostic/Apocrypha texts, it starts to fill in holes that are left out of the Bible. What are we to make of this? Why were these texts not included if it provides more insight into what happened? Is there false information in these texts that are meant to mislead the reader? Or is there more truth in these texts that are deliberately being kept out? Or, as some people speculate, is the Bible a mixture of different religions/myths all rolled into one as an attempt at population control? The bottom line would be, what is the core message of the Bible and does it align with how we should be living on Earth? And the endless pursuit of Truth should lead us closer to the answers. (And as I’ve touched on “channeled material” and vibrations, if one takes consciousness and energy/vibration into account, does everything ultimately depend on our belief/thought system?)
25 Adam made love to his wife again, and she gave birth to a son and named him Seth, saying, “God has granted me another child in place of Abel, since Cain killed him.”
Nowhere is it mentioned that Adam and Eve gave birth to a daughter (yet). So again, I have to ask, where did Cain’s wife come from? She didn’t just fall out of the sky. (Or did she…?)
Now perhaps the Bible didn’t feel it necessary to mention the daughter(s) for one reason or another. Still, it is highly suspect and has to make one wonder why this wasn’t touched upon. Maybe it does in later verses, but as of now we are left in the dark as to this mystery. And the specific way as to how this particular verse alludes to Adam and Eve creating another child to replace Abel neglects to mention the possibility of any other children. Perhaps the significance of male children (son Seth to replace son Abel) was to be focused upon instead of the daughter(s) at this time.

26 Seth also had a son, and he named him Enosh. At that time people began to call on the name of the LORD.

Although I am only 4 chapters into Genesis, I already have many questions and ponderings as to the missing information that I feel would help fill in some of the gaps. As it is now, I do further studies and research into the questions I have, and, as we’ll see later on in the chapter, some of those answers are, indeed, found. If one were to look at the Bible as a mystery novel (for example), there would be no other alternative but to continue reading to see if further revelations will be revealed. Likewise, I can’t expect to have all the answers laid out neatly in a line. So I feel as if reading through and conducting additional research helps.

And again I want to reiterate that some of my thoughts and theories may be way off base, and I also research some other things on the side as well to try and get a broader understanding of what I’m reading, so please bear with me, or, even better, if you have insights that bring more light to these verses, please let me know.

I enjoy bouncing off theories and theology off of each other and love to hear other people’s perspectives on things. Thank you for reading and I look forward to hearing from you!

Fact checking is extremely important. I want to reiterate not to take everything at face value; no matter what you read, where you read it from, or who you hear it from. And to be clear, do not rely on “fact checking” websites to give you accurate information either. These are just as likely, (if not even more likely…), to feed false information and false debunking accounts to manipulate the reader. Please take everything into consideration before adhering to a certain narrative – and always keep your mind open to other possibilities.

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